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January 2014
16
Liferuiner – Future Revisionists Record Label: InVogue Records Release Date: June 4 2013  Future Revisionists, the third full length LP from Canadian metalcore/melodic-hardcore outfit Liferuiner, is the first album by the band I’ve heard. After signing to InVogue Records in 2013, the band released Future Revisionists later in the year, but it slept on me, since I didn’t think I’d like them very much. Fast forward to the beginning of 2014, and this reviewer is trying to get more into melodic hardcore, at least a bit more. On Christmas, I decided to take a look at labelmate Being As An Ocean’s Dear G-d, and I was very impressed with it. It was a melodic hardcore record with some spoken word thrown in, and since I had heard Liferuiner was a melodic hardcore band, Future Revisionists must be worth checking out, right? Well, what’s interesting is that their back catalogue is nothing like this. Starting off as a “joke” band, Liferuiner is not the same band as they started, and from what I’ve gathered, Future Revisionists is a very fitting title, considering this record is a revision of their sound, going into a more melodic hardcore/ambient sound. That leads me back to the question, was this record worth checking out? And the simple answer is yes, and no. It was a very enjoyable record, but comparing the few melodic hardcore bands I’ve gotten into over the month or so, including Counterparts, Being As An Ocean, Stick to Your Guns, and Stray from the Path, Liferuiner is easily the least memorable.  Future Revisionists is a complicated LP, because the band’s sound has definitely shifted, but at the same time, does that mean the band’s “new” sound is good, too? Well, yes, and no. Their new sound is very interesting, mixing metalcore, melodic hardcore, and ambient/progressive metal, but that’s the same thing that fellow Canadian band Counterparts does, and to be blunt, Counterparts does it better. I loved that band’s most recent LP, The Difference Between Hell and Home, released around the same time, because they don’t focus on merely one sound. They have tracks in the record that lean one way, but the whole record is consistent, but they have in enough variety to keep it interesting. Liferuiner, on the other hand, isn’t. They place more emphasis on breakdowns and being more aggressive. And if you like your melodic hardcore less melodic (which somehow makes sense), Liferuiner may be a band you can get into.


For myself, however, I enjoy “challenging” music, and Liferuiner is the perfect example of a band who doesn’t quite “challenge” me in any way, but I still enjoy. By that, I mean their music, at least this LP, is enjoyable, fun, and the lyrics are great, for the most part, but at the same time, they don’t “challenge” me in the sense that they don’t really bring anything new to the table. They do have an intriguing sound that I really like, melodic hardcore mixed with more progressive and ambient elements, but at the same time, it’s not done as well as a band like Counterparts. Liferuiner isn’t a band that blew my mind when I first listened to them, even though I didn’t regret downloading this record. They’re not a band that reinvents the way I think about music, their sound isn’t groundbreaking, nor do they quite stand out from a majority of their peers. They’re not an awful band, but not one that I’d be able to recognize right from hearing a song by them. Not only because I’m not familiar with their discography, but just because they’re not a very unique band, to put it simply.  Just because they are not unique, however, doesn’t mean they aren’t good. As a personal preference, most of my favorite bands or records are ones that are either groundbreaking in some way, really unique, or really make me look at music differently. Liferuiner may not be one those bands, but they don’t hurt anyone and Future Revisionists is not a bad LP. The only thing I really enjoy from this record is their lyrics, because they do have a lot of substance to them. Everything else is nice, too, but nothing captures my attention more on this LP than the lyrics. And one shining example is on the track “Despair,” which goes, “And I know it’s hard falling asleep / when you have nothing to wake up to.” It’s not a line that’s a poetic masterpiece, but it’s one that is simple, but hits hard, especially being that it’s relatable for me.  Aside from the lyrics, Future Revisionists is a bit forgettable, especially since most of the songs kind of bleed together. That’s not to say it wasn’t an enjoyable album worth plenty of spins. If you’re not familiar with melodic hardcore, this is an LP I would stay away from for now. It’s not the best record I’ve heard in the genre, but it’s not awful, either. It bleeds together somewhat, and while everything packs a punch, its lasting value doesn’t. They have the potential to be very unique, but Future Revisionists does revise their sound somewhat, but not enough to put this record on an end of the year list. In fact, Counterparts’ The Difference Between Hell and Home landed on my list, and that’s an example of a record that does this kind of music well. But this album is a good one to listen to if you’re more comfortable with the genre, or if you want something that you can jam out to, and get some rather well written lyrics, but nothing more. Overall rating: 8/10-Bradley

Liferuiner – Future Revisionists
Record Label: InVogue Records
Release Date: June 4 2013 

Future Revisionists, the third full length LP from Canadian metalcore/melodic-hardcore outfit Liferuiner, is the first album by the band I’ve heard. After signing to InVogue Records in 2013, the band released Future Revisionists later in the year, but it slept on me, since I didn’t think I’d like them very much. Fast forward to the beginning of 2014, and this reviewer is trying to get more into melodic hardcore, at least a bit more. On Christmas, I decided to take a look at labelmate Being As An Ocean’s Dear G-d, and I was very impressed with it. It was a melodic hardcore record with some spoken word thrown in, and since I had heard Liferuiner was a melodic hardcore band, Future Revisionists must be worth checking out, right? Well, what’s interesting is that their back catalogue is nothing like this. Starting off as a “joke” band, Liferuiner is not the same band as they started, and from what I’ve gathered, Future Revisionists is a very fitting title, considering this record is a revision of their sound, going into a more melodic hardcore/ambient sound. That leads me back to the question, was this record worth checking out? And the simple answer is yes, and no. It was a very enjoyable record, but comparing the few melodic hardcore bands I’ve gotten into over the month or so, including Counterparts, Being As An Ocean, Stick to Your Guns, and Stray from the Path, Liferuiner is easily the least memorable.

Future Revisionists is a complicated LP, because the band’s sound has definitely shifted, but at the same time, does that mean the band’s “new” sound is good, too? Well, yes, and no. Their new sound is very interesting, mixing metalcore, melodic hardcore, and ambient/progressive metal, but that’s the same thing that fellow Canadian band Counterparts does, and to be blunt, Counterparts does it better. I loved that band’s most recent LP, The Difference Between Hell and Home, released around the same time, because they don’t focus on merely one sound. They have tracks in the record that lean one way, but the whole record is consistent, but they have in enough variety to keep it interesting. Liferuiner, on the other hand, isn’t. They place more emphasis on breakdowns and being more aggressive. And if you like your melodic hardcore less melodic (which somehow makes sense), Liferuiner may be a band you can get into.

For myself, however, I enjoy “challenging” music, and Liferuiner is the perfect example of a band who doesn’t quite “challenge” me in any way, but I still enjoy. By that, I mean their music, at least this LP, is enjoyable, fun, and the lyrics are great, for the most part, but at the same time, they don’t “challenge” me in the sense that they don’t really bring anything new to the table. They do have an intriguing sound that I really like, melodic hardcore mixed with more progressive and ambient elements, but at the same time, it’s not done as well as a band like Counterparts. Liferuiner isn’t a band that blew my mind when I first listened to them, even though I didn’t regret downloading this record. They’re not a band that reinvents the way I think about music, their sound isn’t groundbreaking, nor do they quite stand out from a majority of their peers. They’re not an awful band, but not one that I’d be able to recognize right from hearing a song by them. Not only because I’m not familiar with their discography, but just because they’re not a very unique band, to put it simply.

Just because they are not unique, however, doesn’t mean they aren’t good. As a personal preference, most of my favorite bands or records are ones that are either groundbreaking in some way, really unique, or really make me look at music differently. Liferuiner may not be one those bands, but they don’t hurt anyone and Future Revisionists is not a bad LP. The only thing I really enjoy from this record is their lyrics, because they do have a lot of substance to them. Everything else is nice, too, but nothing captures my attention more on this LP than the lyrics. And one shining example is on the track “Despair,” which goes, “And I know it’s hard falling asleep / when you have nothing to wake up to.” It’s not a line that’s a poetic masterpiece, but it’s one that is simple, but hits hard, especially being that it’s relatable for me.

Aside from the lyrics, Future Revisionists is a bit forgettable, especially since most of the songs kind of bleed together. That’s not to say it wasn’t an enjoyable album worth plenty of spins. If you’re not familiar with melodic hardcore, this is an LP I would stay away from for now. It’s not the best record I’ve heard in the genre, but it’s not awful, either. It bleeds together somewhat, and while everything packs a punch, its lasting value doesn’t. They have the potential to be very unique, but Future Revisionists does revise their sound somewhat, but not enough to put this record on an end of the year list. In fact, Counterparts’ The Difference Between Hell and Home landed on my list, and that’s an example of a record that does this kind of music well. But this album is a good one to listen to if you’re more comfortable with the genre, or if you want something that you can jam out to, and get some rather well written lyrics, but nothing more.

Overall rating: 8/10

-Bradley